The Dead Sea and The Wonderful Benefits of Dead Sea Salts

The Dead Sea is called Ya-Ha Melah (in Hebrew) which is literally, the “sea of salt. The Dead Sea is a landlocked salt- lake, the largest in the world, bordered by Jordan, Israel and the Palestine. Extraordinary climatic and environmental conditions make the Dead Sea a truly remarkable place, and its salt deposits are unlike anything else in the world. The water has 34.2% salinity, which is why people are able to float in the water. The Dead Sea has been an attraction for healing and wellness for thousands of years. That’s because the unique mineral composition of the water, mud, and atmospheric pressure have been shown to improve inflammatory conditions like psoriasis and arthritis. The low pollution and allergen levels of the Dead Sea depression region make it an ideal place to recover from ailments such as asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, and cystic fibrosis. Dead Sea water is a wonderful treatment for dry skin conditions, nourishing the skin and replenishes much-needed moisture.

Jenna Rosenstein,the beauty director of Harper’s Bazaar, fashion magazine, visited the Dead Sea and below are some of her observations:

The water was so warm that it verged on hot. I kept walking until it reached my torso, and then I leaned back and splashed into the sea. I submerged only for a second before popping back up on the surface, like a human rubber duckie.

I’ve tried nearly every facial and skincare product that promises luminous, even skin—nothing compares to a dip in the Dead Sea. And if you can’t fly out there anytime soon, at least pick up a packet (or ten) of Dead Sea bath salts. In this golden age of wellness and self-care, a little salt water might be all you need.

 Using Dead salts has been documented from as far back as biblical times. King Solomon presented the Queen of Sheba with a gift of Dead Sea Salts when she was visiting the Holy Lands. Queen Cleopatra, attributed her great beauty to the secrets of the sea and its salts. She had Marc Anthony conquer the regions surrounding the Dead Sea, so she would always have access to a bountiful supply. Some records state that she established cosmetic clinics to offer salt treatments to her guests, but I found many versions of the facts on this, so I am not sure if that is true.

The area around the Dead Sea has always had an association with mythical worlds. Dead Sea Salts are favoured by Spiritual Healers as it is reported to remove all negative energies which we all pick up on our daily travels. These negative energies attach themselves to our Aura, resulting in a negative impact of our mood, mental state and sometimes physical wellbeing. There are many Spiritual Baths which use Dead Sea Salt, Herbs, and oils that people use to uncross negative conditions. Dead Sea salts can also be added to floor washes to remove negative energies from the home and sprinkling Dead Sea salt outside of the home has the same effect. Tradition has it that placing salt in the four corners of a room keeps negative spirits at bay and purifies the room.

There are over 20 different minerals found in Dead Sea salt aside from sodium chloride, the main constituent of sea salt, including magnesium, calcium, sulphur, bromide, iodine, zinc and potassium. It is these minerals that are the reason behind the wonderful healing and therapeutic qualities of the salt. It contains 10 x the minerals of other natural sea salts. It’s not processed or only had minimal processing, since it comes directly through the evaporation of seawater so it keeps its trace elements.

The many minerals have different properties but the key ones are below:

Sulphur– decongests and is anti- bacterial

Calcium– promotes skin growth and regeneration

Sodium– cleanses and exfoliates, revives sore muscles and neutralizes free radicals

Zinc and Potassium– work to promote moisture retention, keeping the skin, plump and hydrated

Magnesium– detoxifies and cleanses the epidermis

Bromide – helps relieve allergic reactions of the skin by reducing inflammation

Iron– stimulating circulation

These essential minerals naturally occur in our bodies but must be replenished, as they are lost throughout the day and are known to treat, detoxify, and cleanse our bodies.

So, if your nightly baths need an extra boost add a touch of salts as these are very absorbent, they mix well with essential oils giving even more health benefits. Dead Sea salt baths are known for their ability to ease stress, boost your overall health and promote better sleep. Putting them in a hot bath can have the same results as low- level exercise. Stretching and moving in the water can also provide a low impact workout for pains in the muscles and joints. If you are unable to have a full bath Dead Sea salts work really well in a footbath. Soothing achy, overworked legs and feet and reducing swelling.

 Research has proven that soaking regularly in water enriched with Dead Sea salt can provide relief from many unpleasant skin disorders. Problem areas can also be exfoliated using Dead Sea Salts as the grainy texture helps to detoxify and shifts blemishes whilst stimulating the blood flow.

Warm water and Dead Sea salt are generally safe for most people. However, there are some precautions to consider before you take a soak in the bath. It is important not to be use them, if you have had an allergic reaction, have an open cut or wound, as the salt can cause stinging sensations.

In the 1960’s, Habitat in the Kings Road started selling Dead Sea salts as an ozone- rich bath treatments giving the same feelings of well- being attached to the seaside. In 2020, I would agree that Dead Sea Salts still have all the wonderful healing aspects of the sea and are a lovely addition to any bath.

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